Dorothy’s Never Fail Pie Crust – recipies from bob waldrop.net

PIE ARE ROUND, CORNBREAD ARE SQUARE, COBBLER ARE TASTY

A good pie starts with a good pie crust.

I once complained to my grandmother Dovie Waldrop, who was certainly one of the best pie-makers in Tillman County’s history, that I couldn’t make a decent pie crust. She said, “Bobby Max, that’s because you haven’t made enough pies. When you have made 100 pies, you will be able to make a great pie crust.” My favorite pie crust recipe is “Dorothy’s Never Fail Pie Crust.” I don’t know who the “Dorothy” is in the title, but bless her heart because it is a great pie crust recipe.

The professional chefs I know are puzzled about the inclusion of an egg, but oh well, it works and tastes great and that’s what matters. I found the recipe in a church cookbook I bought for a quarter in a used book store.

Dorothy’s Never Fail Pie Crust

3 cups flour |

1/4 teaspoon salt |

1-1/4 cup butter |

1 beaten egg |

1 tablespoon vinegar |

5 tablespoons water

Mix the flour and salt, add the butter, mix thoroughly. You can mix this in a blender or you could use a mixer. You can use a pastry cutter or a fork or a blender. The point is to thoroughly mix the flour and the butter.

Mix the water and the vinegar, add that and the egg, mix together with a fork. Knead a few times. Roll out on a floured board. Manipulate it only as much as necessary, the more you roll it, the tougher it will get.

Place the dough between two sheets of wax paper when rolling it out. To put it in pie pan, fold it in half, and then again in quarters, place in baking dish. Then unfold and arrange in pan. If the dough tears, dip your fingers in water and press it back into place, or “patch” with extra pieces of dough.

There are as many different recipes for pie crust, this recipe is among the less complicated. PS. The real secret to a truly delectable flaky pie crust is to use LARD instead of oil or butter or (shudder) hydrogenated shortening. Don’t use the hydrogenated lard found in stores. Find a farmer, get him or her to raise a pig for you, take the pig to a custom butcher, and get your lard that way. That’s what we do.

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